Mercury News


The event brought together faculty, researchers, and students to celebrate the Institute’s interdisciplinary space research.



The annual Faculty and Staff Honors Luncheon took place Friday, April 26.



The Center for Teaching and Learning recently hosted an annual ceremony to honor Teaching Assistants (TAs) at Georgia Tech, celebrating excellence in teaching throughout the Institute and acknowledging the invaluable role TAs and future faculty play in shaping the minds of students and enriching the academic community at Tech.  



Their awards total more than $9.5 million in funding, the most Georgia Tech has ever had in the program.



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Students from all six College of Sciences schools were recognized for excellence at this year's celebration.



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Shortly after the start of the fourth LIGO-Virgo-KAGRA (LVK) observing run, the LIGO Livingston detector observed a remarkable gravitational-wave signal from the collision of what is most likely a neutron star with an unknown compact object — one that's 2.5 to 4.5 times the mass of the Sun.



This week, 50 students from Georgia Tech’s Astronomy Club will travel to Missouri to view the solar eclipse on April 8. Georgia isn’t in the path of totality — which occurs when the moon fully covers the sun — but Missouri is, and club members want to be there to experience the rare celestial event. While viewing the eclipse is the organization’s biggest adventure of the year, it is just one of many events the club hosts every month. The group is a place for hobbyist astronomers and physics students to connect over their love of the solar system and the mysteries within it.



As the April 8 solar eclipse approaches, millions of people anticipate participating in the wonder of this celestial event. Yet, for those with visual impairments, traditional methods of observing such phenomena may present limitations. Fortunately, resources from the team of Tech’s Sonification Lab offer an inclusive approach.



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Sparked by a professor’s interest, 55 students from the School of Physics will travel to Illinois to enter the path of totality for the April 8 total solar eclipse.  



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Scientists at Georgia Tech have teamed up with the University of Southern California (USC), University of Pennsylvania, Texas A&M, Oregon State, Temple University, and NASA Johnson Space Center to teach dog-like robots to navigate craters of the Moon and other challenging planetary surfaces in research funded by NASA.



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Wise, a professor in the School of Physics and director of the Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, spoke to how the James Webb Space Telescope has impacted astrophysics and our understanding of the formation of galaxies and black holes — a research area he specializes in at Georgia Tech.



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While outside of the path of totality, the Georgia Tech community can still take part in the historic April total solar eclipse.