Probing the Connections between Gamma-Ray Bursts and Supernovae through High-Energy Neutrinos and Gamma Rays

Probing the Connections between Gamma-Ray Bursts and Supernovae through High-Energy Neutrinos and Gamma Rays

Date

May 12, 2016 -
3:00pm to 4:00pm

Location

Boggs Building, CRA Visualization Lab

Room

1-90

Affiliation

Penn State University

Abstract: Long gamma-ray bursts and supernovae are known to be the most explosive astrophysical phenomena in the Universe. Both are related to the deaths of massive stars, but their physical relationship has been a mystery for many years. Recent progress in hard X-ray and optical observations has revealed new populations of gamma-ray bursts and supernovae, such as ultra-long gamma-ray bursts and super-luminous supernovae, and these transients may be connected to each other. It has been suggested that such a diversity is caused by their unknown central engine or catastrophic mass loss before the explosion. We discuss how high-energy neutrinos and gamma rays can be used to unveil the connections and underlying physical mechanisms.