Eric Sembrat's Test Bonanza

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Public Lecture: Non-Euclidean Virtual Reality

The 2016 confirmation of Einstein's prediction of gravitational waves has put the spotlight back on the importance of curvature for the physics of the universe. While the ability of mass to curve our space has fueled the imagination of many, it is by far not the only instance of warped spaces being important for physics: The materials science of the very small scale -the science of nanostructures and nanoengineering- is one of them.

Soft Condensed Matter & Physics of Living Systems

Abstract:

Almost all animals must move to survive and reproduce. But it's rarely easy to move in the wild - animals typically face multiple challenges when trying to get from A to B. This talk will present loosely connected work centered on how gait, gait regulation, and gait adaptation in many-legged animals can give insight into several interesting aspects of locomotor biology.

Design of materials for gene delivery using molecular modeling

Abstract

Gene therapy holds the promise of treatment of numerous diseases including many types of cancer, cardiovascular diseases and genetic disorders. Even though methods for gene delivery have been an active research area since early 90s, no gene therapeutic agents have been FDA approved for use in humans. The progress in gene therapy has been hindered by lack of safe, predictable, and reliable methods for packaging, delivery, and transport of genetic material.

On the Stability and Optical Activity of Metallic and Bimetallic Protected Nanoclusters

Abstract

Some of the main challenges in nanoscience and nanotechnology are the reproducibility and uniformity of the properties of nanostructures. These are crucial for the advancement of this field from the fundamental point of view and future applications. The study of metallic nanoparticles passivated with thiolate ligands has rapidly grown over the last two decades. Synthesis methods have allowed obtaining nanoparticles with a precise number of atoms, which ensures the uniformity and reproducibility of their physical properties.

Public Nights at the Georgia Tech Observatory

Public Nights at the Georgia Tech Observatory are back for 2018-2019! The observatory will be open one Thursday each month for people to observe various celestial bodies. A talk will be given about thirty minutes after the Public Night begins.

Series Schedule

Sep.20, 8-10:30  Moon, Saturn, Mars

Oct.18, 7:30-10  Moon, Mars

Nov.15, 7-9  Moon, Mars

Dec.13, 7-9  Moon, Mars

Jan.17, 7-9  Moon, Orion Nebula

Feb.14, 7-9  Moon, Orion Nebula

March 14, 8-10:30  Moon, Orion Nebula

Public Nights at the Georgia Tech Observatory

Public nights at the Georgia Tech Observatory are back for 2018-2019! The observatory will be open one Thursday each month for people to observe various celestial bodies. A talk will be given about thirty minutes after the Public Night begins.

Series Schedule

Sep.20, 8-10:30  Moon, Saturn, Mars

Oct.18, 7:30-10  Moon, Mars

Nov.15, 7-9  Moon, Mars

Dec.13, 7-9  Moon, Mars

Jan.17, 7-9  Moon, Orion Nebula

Feb.14, 7-9  Moon, Orion Nebula

March 14, 8-10:30  Moon, Orion Nebula

Probing excitons in transition metal dichalcogenides monolayers with high magnetic fields

Abstract

Strong Coulomb interactions in single-layer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) result in the emergence of strongly bound excitons. These excitons and excitonic complexes, trions or biexcitons, for example, possess the valley degree of freedom and can be either optically bright or dark, depending on the spin configuration of the conduction and valence bands. In this talk, I will review our recent efforts on probing and controlling excitons in monolayer MoSe2 and WSe2 TMDs with high magnetic fields.

Charge-doping a Mott insulator via graphene heterostructures

Abstract

a-RuCl3 is a layered antiferromagnetic Mott insulator that is believed to host a Kitaev quantum spin liquid, and notably there has been a claim for non-Abelian transport seen in a quantized thermal Hall conductance experiment. Seeking a means to access this physics by electronic means, we have begun exploring this material by exfoliation a la graphene. In particular, we have incorporated RuCl3 flakes into so-called van der Waals heterostructures.

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