"From Lattice QCD to Graphene and Ultracold Fermi Gases"

"From Lattice QCD to Graphene and Ultracold Fermi Gases"

Obtaining a priori information on strongly interacting many-fermion systems remains a challenging problem in theoretical physics. A promising way forward is the use of Monte Carlo simulations, which are non-perturbative and take full account of quantum fluctuations. A famous example is Lattice QCD, which aims to elucidate the interactions between quarks and gluons at low energies, where QCD is strongly coupled. I will provide an update
on the application of such methods to closely related problems in condensed matter and atomic physics, highlighting modern computational and algorithmic developments. Specific examples include graphene and strongly coupled ultracold Fermi gases.

Date

May 24, 2011 - 9:00am

Obtaining a priori information on strongly interacting many-fermion systems remains a challenging problem in theoretical physics. A promising way forward is the use of Monte Carlo simulations, which are non-perturbative and take full account of quantum fluctuations. A famous example is Lattice QCD, which aims to elucidate the interactions between quarks and gluons at low energies, where QCD is strongly coupled. I will provide an update
on the application of such methods to closely related problems in condensed matter and atomic physics, highlighting modern computational and algorithmic developments. Specific examples include graphene and strongly coupled ultracold Fermi gases.