Eric Sembrat's Test Bonanza

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Next Stop Graphene Valley? Research discovery promises greener, cheaper, more powerful chips

Sunday, June 27, 2010

A discovery by Paul Sheehan of the Naval Research Laboratory, Elisa Riedo at Georgia Institute of Technology and their colleagues paints a prettier picture of how graphene-based semiconductors might be built in the near future.  For further information see: http://www.sys-con.com/node/1445659.

 

Summary: 

A discovery by Paul Sheehan of the Naval Research Laboratory, Elisa Riedo at Georgia Institute of Technology and their colleagues paints a prettier picture of how graphene-based semiconductors might be built in the near future. For further information see: http://www.sys-con.com/node/1445659.

Intro: 

A discovery by Paul Sheehan of the Naval Research Laboratory, Elisa Riedo at Georgia Institute of Technology and their colleagues paints a prettier picture of how graphene-based semiconductors might be built in the near future. For further information see: http://www.sys-con.com/node/1445659.

Alumni: 

Georgia Tech Bioengineering Graduate Student Wins Best Paper at RSS 2010

Monday, July 12, 2010

Ryan Maladen, a doctoral candidate in the bioengineering program at Georgia Tech, won the best paper award at the 2010 Robotics Science and Systems (RSS) conference held June 27-30, 2010, at the Universidad de Zaragoza in Zaragoza, Spain.

(Georgia Tech Press Release, July 12, 2010)

Summary: 

Ryan Maladen, a doctoral candidate in the bioengineering program at Georgia Tech, won the best paper award at the 2010 Robotics Science and Systems (RSS) conference held June 27-30, 2010, at the Universidad de Zaragoza in Zaragoza, Spain.

Intro: 

Ryan Maladen, a doctoral candidate in the bioengineering program at Georgia Tech, won the best paper award at the 2010 Robotics Science and Systems (RSS) conference held June 27-30, 2010, at the Universidad de Zaragoza in Zaragoza, Spain.

Alumni: 

Graphene reveals yet more electronic complexity

Wednesday, August 11, 2010

Graphene research has discovered hidden interactions that will affect the way components are designed from the super-fast material. Scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology and the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have determined how the orbits of electrons interact with magnetic fields applied to epitaxial graphene.

Steve Bush, ElectronicsWeekly.com

Summary: 

Graphene research has discovered hidden interactions that will affect the way components are designed from the super-fast material. Scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology and the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have determined how the orbits of electrons interact with magnetic fields applied to epitaxial graphene.

Intro: 

Graphene research has discovered hidden interactions that will affect the way components are designed from the super-fast material. Scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology and the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have determined how the orbits of electrons interact with magnetic fields applied to epitaxial graphene.

Alumni: 

Physics Undergraduate Stefan Froehlich a winner of SAIC Student Paper Competition

Monday, November 22, 2010

Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), a FORTUNE 500 company, has instituted the annual Georgia Tech Student Paper Competition for outstanding technical papers in the fields of engineering, physics, chemistry, applied mathematics, computer sciences, medicine, and science and technology policy written by students at the undergraduate, master’s, and Ph.D. levels. Senior Stefan Froehlich, double major in Physics and Mathematics, is one of the six winners of the 2010 SAIC $1,000 award for his single-author paper "Reducing continuous symmetries with linear slice" submitted to the competition. This research is supported by  a Georgia Tech President’s Undergraduate Research Award and Prof. Predrag Cvitanović's National Science Foundation grant DMR 0820054.

Summary: 

Senior Stefan Froehlich, double major in Physics and Mathematics, is one of the six winners of the 2010 SAIC $1,000 award for his single-author paper "Reducing continuous symmetries with linear slice" submitted to the competition.

Intro: 

Senior Stefan Froehlich, double major in Physics and Mathematics, is one of the six winners of the 2010 SAIC $1,000 award for his single-author paper "Reducing continuous symmetries with linear slice" submitted to the competition.

Alumni: 

FORCE AND FLOW TRANSITION IN PLOWED GRANULAR MEDIA

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

Student Nick Gravish and Assistant Professor Dan Goldman use plate drag to study the response of granular media to localized forcing as a function of volume fraction ϕ. A bifurcation in the force and flow occurs at the onset of dilatancy ϕc. Below ϕc rapid fluctuations in the drag force FD are observed. Above ϕc fluctuations in FD are periodic and increase in magnitude with ϕ. Velocity field measurements indicate that the bifurcation in FD results from the formation of stable shear bands above ϕc which are created and destroyed periodically during drag. A friction-based wedge flow model captures the dynamics for ϕ>ϕc.

Summary: 

Student Nick Gravish and Assistant Professor Dan Goldman use plate drag to study the response of granular media to localized forcing as a function of volume fraction ϕ.

Intro: 

Student Nick Gravish and Assistant Professor Dan Goldman use plate drag to study the response of granular media to localized forcing as a function of volume fraction ϕ.

Alumni: 

Plowing Through a Granular Medium

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

Physicists Nick Gravish and Daniel Goldman (Georgia Tech) and Paul Umbanhowar (Northwestern University) have conducted a systematic study of how the drag force on a vertical plate partially submerged in sand-sized glass beads depends on the beads’ packing fraction ϕ. Their study reveals a surprising phenomenon: For a dense packing—that is, when ϕ exceeds a critical value ϕc—the drag force oscillates as the plate moves horizontally. The crucial physics, argue the authors, hinges on the phenomenon of dilatancy: densely packed beads can become less dense when sheared. Dragging a plate through a dense packing creates a “shear plane” that runs from the bottom edge of the plate to the surface of the beads and makes an angle θ with the horizontal. Particles near the shear plane tend to move parallel to it, toward the surface; particles beyond the plane hardly move at all (see the figure). Shear forces arising at the plane cause the local packing fraction to decrease, which makes it easier to move the plate. When the packing fraction dips to ϕc, the shear plane remains stationary at the surface even as its bottom edge moves with the plate; thus θ increases, which causes the drag force to also increase. Once the drag force is high enough, a new low-θ, high-ϕ shear plane forms, and the cycle repeats. (N. Gravish, P. B. Umbanhowar, D. I. Goldman, Phys. Rev. Lett., in press.

Physics Today, Steven K. Blau

Summary: 

Physicists Nick Gravish and Daniel Goldman (Georgia Tech) and Paul Umbanhowar (Northwestern University) have conducted a systematic study of how the drag force on a vertical plate partially submerged in sand-sized glass beads depends on the beads’ packing fraction ϕ.

Intro: 

Physicists Nick Gravish and Daniel Goldman (Georgia Tech) and Paul Umbanhowar (Northwestern University) have conducted a systematic study of how the drag force on a vertical plate partially submerged in sand-sized glass beads depends on the beads’ packing fraction ϕ.

Alumni: 

How Sea Turtle Hatchlings Move Quickly on Sand

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

Hatchlings sea turtles must move quickly over a variety of terrain to reach the ocean.  Dr. Daniel Goldman along with Biology graduate student Nicole Mazouchova, Physics graduate student Nick Gravish and research technician Andri Savu studied in the field (Jekyll Island, GA) how Loggerhead hatchlings move on loose sand and on hard ground. The study revealed that on sand the turtles solidified the material behind their limbs and achieved performance comparable to that on hard ground. The results of this study could be valuable to biologists who seek to understand mechanics organisms use to move in the natural world as well as to roboticists who would like to build robots with performance comparable to animals. For more about this study see http://www.physics.gatech.edu/research/goldman/pages/research/projects/turtle.html.

Summary: 

Hatchlings sea turtles must move quickly over a variety of terrain to reach the ocean. Dr. Daniel Goldman along with Biology graduate student Nicole Mazouchova, Physics graduate student Nick Gravish and research technician Andri Savu studied in the field (Jekyll Island, GA) how Loggerhead hatchlings move on loose sand and on hard ground.

Intro: 

Hatchlings sea turtles must move quickly over a variety of terrain to reach the ocean. Dr. Daniel Goldman along with Biology graduate student Nicole Mazouchova, Physics graduate student Nick Gravish and research technician Andri Savu studied in the field (Jekyll Island, GA) how Loggerhead hatchlings move on loose sand and on hard ground.

Alumni: 

Trebino Presented Prism Award

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

The Society of Photo-Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE), an international society devoted to advancing light-based research, awarded Professor Rick Trebino and his company, Swamp Optics, the 2009 Prism Award in optics for his invention of the “BOA Pulse Compressor.”  Before the BOA, which stands for Bother-free Optimized Arrangement, compressing ultrashort laser pulses (which inconveniently expand as they propagate through optics) required multiple prisms, arranged extremely precisely relative to one another.  If the light source or prisms were off by the tiniest bit or the laser pulse was tuned to a slightly different wavelength, the output pulse would be badly distorted, and the entire device would require a tedious realignment.  Prof. Trebino’s invention uses only one prism, a corner cube, and a roof mirror.  It takes advantage of a clever new design and the extremely accurate manufacturing that occurs for corner cubes, which reflect a beam back essentially perfectly parallel to the beam incident on them.  As a result, the elegant device is automatically aligned and yields distortion-free pulses.  For further information, go to www.swampoptics.com.

 

Summary: 

The Society of Photo-Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE), an international society devoted to advancing light-based research, awarded Professor Rick Trebino and his company, Swamp Optics, the 2009 Prism Award in optics for his invention of the “BOA Pulse Compressor.” Before the BOA, which stands for Bother-free Optimized Arrangement, compressing ultrashort laser pulses (which inconveniently expand as they propagate through optics) required multiple prisms, arranged extremely precisely relative to one another.

Intro: 

The Society of Photo-Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE), an international society devoted to advancing light-based research, awarded Professor Rick Trebino and his company, Swamp Optics, the 2009 Prism Award in optics for his invention of the “BOA Pulse Compressor.” Before the BOA, which stands for Bother-free Optimized Arrangement, compressing ultrashort laser pulses (which inconveniently expand as they propagate through optics) required multiple prisms, arranged extremely precisely relative to one another.

Alumni: 

Quantum Signals Converted to Telecommunications Wavelengths

Sunday, September 26, 2010

Using optically dense, ultra-cold clouds of rubidium atoms, researchers have made advances in three key elements needed for quantum information systems -- including a technique for converting photons carrying quantum data to wavelengths that can be transmitted long distances on optical fiber telecom networks.  See the full press release here.

Summary: 

Using optically dense, ultra-cold clouds of rubidium atoms, researchers have made advances in three key elements needed for quantum information systems -- including a technique for converting photons carrying quantum data to wavelengths that can be transmitted long distances on optical fiber telecom networks.

Intro: 

Using optically dense, ultra-cold clouds of rubidium atoms, researchers have made advances in three key elements needed for quantum information systems -- including a technique for converting photons carrying quantum data to wavelengths that can be transmitted long distances on optical fiber telecom networks.

Alumni: 

Dan Goldman receives Sigman Xi Award

Thursday, June 3, 2010

Assistant Professor Dan Goldman has won one of the Sigma Xi Young Faculty Awards given to faculty of rank no higher than assistant professor for the outstanding paper (or papers all in a single subject area) published in scholarly journals between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2008, based on research performed at Georgia Tech. Dan’s interest focuses on the mechanics of locomotion of organisms and models of organisms as they scurry on and within matter like sand. The foot steps and body-undulations of his study subjects (lizards, crabs, cockroaches and robots) push him to understand interaction with materials which can display complex fluid and solid properties in response to perturbation.

 

 

Summary: 

Assistant Professor Dan Goldman has won one of the Sigma Xi Young Faculty Awards given to faculty of rank no higher than assistant professor for the outstanding paper (or papers all in a single subject area) published in scholarly journals between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2008, based on research performed at Georgia Tech

Intro: 

Assistant Professor Dan Goldman has won one of the Sigma Xi Young Faculty Awards given to faculty of rank no higher than assistant professor for the outstanding paper (or papers all in a single subject area) published in scholarly journals between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2008, based on research performed at Georgia Tech

Alumni: 

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