Eric Sembrat's Test Bonanza

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Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship Awarded to Shina Tan

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

Awarded annually since 1955, Alfred P. Sloan Fellowships are given to early-career scientists and scholars in recognition of achievement and the potential to contribute substantially to their fields. “The scientists and researchers selected for this year’s Sloan Research Fellowships represent the very brightest rising stars of this generation of scholars,” says Dr. Paul L. Joskow, President of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. “The Foundation is proud to be able to support their work at this important stage in their careers.”  Potential fellows must be nominated for recognition by their peers and are subsequently selected by an independent panel of senior scholars. Assistant Professor Shina Tan’s nomination to the Sloan Foundation was prepared by Professor Mei-Yin Chou.

As the communication from the Sloan Foundation states: “...this is an extraordinarily competitive award, involving nominations for most of the very best scholars of [Shina's] generation from the United States and Canada.” The School applauds this external recognition of what we have known for some time—that Shina has discovered beautiful and timeless results in the exciting field of the physics of ultracold atoms and molecules, and that the research paths that he is currently charting are brimming with potential.
 
Other Sloan Fellows from the School of Physics are Professor Mei-Yin Chou (1990), Professor Ahmet Erbil (1985), and Professor Ronald Fox (1974).

Summary: 

Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship Awarded to Shina Tan.

Intro: 

Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship Awarded to Shina Tan.

Alumni: 

Drs. Greco and Grigoriev win the François Frenkiel Award

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Dr. Edwin Greco and Associate Professor Roman Grigoriev won the François Frenkiel Award from the Division of Fluid Dynamics of the American Physical Society.

Summary: 

Dr. Edwin Greco and Associate Professor Roman Grigoriev won the 2010 François Frenkiel Award from the Division of Fluid Dynamics of the American Physical Society.

Intro: 

Dr. Edwin Greco and Associate Professor Roman Grigoriev won the 2010 François Frenkiel Award from the Division of Fluid Dynamics of the American Physical Society.

Alumni: 

Making Contact: New Study Quantifies the Electron Transport Effects of Placing Metal Contacts onto Graphene

Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Using large-scale supercomputer calculations, researchers have analyzed how the placement of metallic contacts on graphene changes the electron transport properties of the material as a factor of junction length, width and orientation.  The work is believed to be the first quantitative study of electron transport through metal-graphene junctions to examine earlier models in significant detail.

View the entire article here.

Summary: 

Using large-scale supercomputer calculations, researchers have analyzed how the placement of metallic contacts on graphene changes the electron transport properties of the material as a factor of junction length, width and orientation.

Intro: 

Using large-scale supercomputer calculations, researchers have analyzed how the placement of metallic contacts on graphene changes the electron transport properties of the material as a factor of junction length, width and orientation.

Alumni: 

Sea Turtle Travel: Study Shows How Hatchlings Use their Flippers to Move Quickly on Sand

Thursday, February 25, 2010

Georgia Tech researchers conducted the first field study showing how endangered loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings use their limbs to move quickly on a variety of terrains in order to reach the ocean.

View the entire article here.

Summary: 

Georgia Tech researchers conducted the first field study showing how endangered loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings use their limbs to move quickly on a variety of terrains in order to reach the ocean.

Intro: 

Georgia Tech researchers conducted the first field study showing how endangered loggerhead sea turtle hatchlings use their limbs to move quickly on a variety of terrains in order to reach the ocean.

Alumni: 

Seeing Moire in Graphene

Wednesday, March 31, 2010

The ability to determine the rotational orientation of graphene sheets and map strain is useful for
understanding the electronic and transport properties of multiple layers of graphene, a one-atom
thick form of carbon with potentially revolutionary semiconducting properties. The research
appears in the journal, Physical Review B, in volume 81, issue 12.


In digital photography, moiré (pronounced mwar-ray) patterns occur because of errors in the
rendering process, which causes grid patterns to look wavy or distorted. Materials scientists have
been using microscopic moiré patterns to detect stresses such as wrinkles or bulges in a variety
of materials.


Researchers created graphene on the surface of a silicon carbide substrate at the Georgia Institute
of Technology by heating one side so that only carbon, in the form of multilayer sheets of
graphene, was left. Using a custom-built scanning tunneling microscope at NIST, the researchers
were able to peer through the topmost layers of graphene to the layers beneath. This process,
which the group dubbed "atomic moiré interferometry," enabled them to image the patterns
created by the stacked graphene layers, which in turn allowed the group to model how the
hexagonal lattices of the individual graphene layers were stacked in relation to one another.
Unlike other materials that tend to stretch out when they cool, graphene bunches up like a
wrinkled bed sheet. The researchers were able to map these stress fields by comparing the
relative distortion of the hexagons of carbon atoms that comprise the individual graphene layers.
Their technique is so sensitive that it is able to detect strains in the graphene layers causing as
little as a 0.1 percent change in atom spacing.


"There's an ideal atomic lattice spacing in graphene. Knowing the strain distribution can help us
in our efforts to create graphene with good electronic properties," said Phillip N. First, professor
in the School of Physics at Georgia Tech. "So far, it looks as if multi-layered graphene has
excellent conduction properties and may be useful for electronic applications."
This collaboration between Georgia Tech and NIST is part of a series of experiments aimed at
gaining a fundamental understanding of the properties of graphene. Other examples of the
group's work can been seen at www.mrs.org/s_mrs/bin.asp?CID=8684&DID=320520&DOC=FILE.PDF and
www.mrs.org/s_mrs/bin.asp?CID=26616&DID=320529&DOC=FILE.PDF
Their article, "Structural analysis of multilayer graphene via atomic moiré interferometry" was
selected as an Editor's Highlight in Physical Review B for the month of March, 2010.

CoS in the News, Mark Esser and David Terraso(writers)

Summary: 

The ability to determine the rotational orientation of graphene sheets and map strain is useful for understanding the electronic and transport properties of multiple layers of graphene, a one-atom thick form of carbon with potentially revolutionary semiconducting properties.

Intro: 

The ability to determine the rotational orientation of graphene sheets and map strain is useful for understanding the electronic and transport properties of multiple layers of graphene, a one-atom thick form of carbon with potentially revolutionary semiconducting properties.

Alumni: 

Scientists Strive to Replace Silicon with Graphene on Nanocircuitry

Thursday, June 10, 2010

Scientists have made a breakthrough toward creating nanocircuitry on graphene, widely regarded as the most promising candidate to replace silicon as the building block of transistors. They have devised a simple and quick one-step process based on thermochemical nanolithography (TCNL) for creating nanowires, tuning the electronic properties of reduced graphene oxide on the nanoscale and thereby allowing it to switch from being an insulating material to a conducting material.

View the entire article here.

Summary: 

Scientists have made a breakthrough toward creating nanocircuitry on graphene, widely regarded as the most promising candidate to replace silicon as the building block of transistors. They have devised a simple and quick one-step process based on thermochemical nanolithography (TCNL) for creating nanowires, tuning the electronic properties of reduced graphene oxide on the nanoscale and thereby allowing it to switch from being an insulating material to a conducting material.

Intro: 

Scientists have made a breakthrough toward creating nanocircuitry on graphene, widely regarded as the most promising candidate to replace silicon as the building block of transistors. They have devised a simple and quick one-step process based on thermochemical nanolithography (TCNL) for creating nanowires, tuning the electronic properties of reduced graphene oxide on the nanoscale and thereby allowing it to switch from being an insulating material to a conducting material.

Alumni: 

Robot-like Lizard Can Swim Through Sand

Friday, June 25, 2010

Assistant Professor Daniel Goldman’s team at the Georgia Institute of Technology decided to find out how sandfish, once submerged, tucks its limbs into its sides and propels itself forward by wiggling from side to side.

View the entire article here.

Summary: 

Assistant Professor Daniel Goldman’s team at the Georgia Institute of Technology decided to find out how sandfish, once submerged, tucks its limbs into its sides and propels itself forward by wiggling from side to side.

Intro: 

Assistant Professor Daniel Goldman’s team at the Georgia Institute of Technology decided to find out how sandfish, once submerged, tucks its limbs into its sides and propels itself forward by wiggling from side to side.

Alumni: 

Write Circuits on Graphene: A heated AFM tip can draw nanometers-wide conductive lines on graphene oxide

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory "write" nanoribbons on a surface rather than cutting graphene.

Hot wire: An AFM tip heated to over 150 °C can etch an insulating graphene oxide surface to create thin conductive nanoscale wires.

Credit: Debin Wang, Georgia Tech

Summary: 

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory "write" nanoribbons on a surface rather than cutting graphene. An AFM tip heated to over 150 °C can etch an insulating graphene oxide surface to create thin conductive nanoscale wires.

Intro: 

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory "write" nanoribbons on a surface rather than cutting graphene. An AFM tip heated to over 150 °C can etch an insulating graphene oxide surface to create thin conductive nanoscale wires.

Alumni: 

Walt de Heer wins the 2010 MRS Medal

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Walt de Heer wins the 2010 MRS Medal "For his pioneering contributions to the science and technology of epitaxial graphene."

Currently a Regents' Professor of Physics at the Georgia Institute of Technology, he directs the Epitaxial Graphene Laboratory in the School of Physics and leads the Epitaxial Graphene Interdisciplinary Research Group at the Georgia Tech Materials Research Science and Engineering Center.

De Heer and his research groups have made significant contributions to several areas in nanoscopic physics. In 1995, De Heer’s research turned to carbon nanotubes, showing that they are excellent field emitters with potential application to flat panel displays. In 1998, he discovered that carbon nanotubes are ballistic conductors, which is a key property for graphene-based electronics. In 2001, his work led to the development of graphene-based electronics. This project was funded by Intel Corporation in 2003 and by the National Science Foundation (NSF) in 2004. His paper, Ultrathin Epitaxial Graphite: Two-Dimensional Electron Gas Properties and a Route Towards Graphene-Based Electronics, published in 2004, laid the experimental and conceptual foundation for graphene-based electronics. De Heer holds the first patent for graphene-based electronics that was provisionally filed in June 2003.

Georgia Tech Press Release:
http://www.gatech.edu/newsroom/release.html?nid=63022

Summary: 

Walt de Heer, currently a Regents' Professor of Physics at the Georgia Institute of Technology, wins the 2010 MRS Medal "For his pioneering contributions to the science and technology of epitaxial graphene."

Intro: 

Walt de Heer, currently a Regents' Professor of Physics at the Georgia Institute of Technology, wins the 2010 MRS Medal "For his pioneering contributions to the science and technology of epitaxial graphene."

Alumni: 

Shina Tan awarded the 2010 George E. Valley Prize by APS

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Shina Tan has been awarded the 2010 George E. Valley Prize by the American Physical Society “For the exact relations he derived for Strongly Interacting Fermi gases with large scattering length, which are found to be of fundamental importance in cold atom physics.” 

He joined the School of Physics of the Georgia Institute of Technology as an Assistant Professor in August of 2010.  Tan's major research interests to date have been the general quantum many-body problem and the few-body physics of ultracold atoms and molecules.  By inventing a new set of generalized functions, Tan solved the equivalent of the ultraviolet divergence problem for the strongly interacting Fermi gas with large scattering length and derived a set of exact relations for the energy, momentum distribution, and pair correlation function. The latter are now called the "Tan relations".   His results demonstrated that the behavior of the momentum distribution far away from the Fermi surface plays an essential role. Prof. Tan's research has significantly impacted both experimental and theoretical research in the field of cold atoms.

Summary: 

Shina Tan has been awarded the 2010 George E. Valley Prize by the American Physical Society “For the exact relations he derived for Strongly Interacting Fermi gases with large scattering length, which are found to be of fundamental importance in cold atom physics.”

Intro: 

Shina Tan has been awarded the 2010 George E. Valley Prize by the American Physical Society “For the exact relations he derived for Strongly Interacting Fermi gases with large scattering length, which are found to be of fundamental importance in cold atom physics.”

Alumni: 

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