Eric Sembrat's Test Bonanza

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Visualizing the Birth of Galaxies: Episode 5, Starring John Wise

Monday, September 17, 2018

Episode 5 of ScienceMatters' Season 1 stars John Wise. Listen to the podcast here and read the transcript here!

Possible scenarios for the birth of stars, galaxies, and black holes come alive in the data crunching and visualizations of John Wise, a professor in the School of Physics. Wise explains how his simulations and visualizations -- some of which have won awards -- helps researchers "rewind" space and time back to the origins of the universe.

Wise studies the intricacies of the nearby and distant universe, using state-of-the-art numerical simulations that are run on the world's largest supercomputers.

Wise won the College of Sciences' Eric Immel Award in 2015 for Excellence in Teaching. He was the recipient of the Dunn Family Professorship from 2015-2017, and was a NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow from 2007-2009.

Take a listen at sciencematters.gatech.edu.

Enter to win a prize by answering the question for Episode 5:

What is the name of the University of Illinois supercomputer mentioned in Episode 5 that John Wise uses for visualizations and simulations?

Submit your entry by 11 AM on Monday, Sept. 24, at sciencematters.gatech.edu. Answer and winner will be announced shortly after the quiz closes.

Media Contact: 

A. Maureen Rouhi, Ph.D.
Director of Communications
College of Sciences

Summary: 

His visualizations of the heavens look like they are straight from Hollywood movie blockbusters. But John Wise's goal is to help researchers understand possible scenarios for the birth of stars and massive black holes. Wise talks about his research in ScienceMatters Episode 5.

Intro: 

His visualizations of the heavens look like they are straight from Hollywood movie blockbusters. But John Wise's goal is to help researchers understand possible scenarios for the birth of stars and massive black holes. Wise talks about his research in ScienceMatters Episode 5.

Alumni: 

Prof. O'Shea publishes new book

Monday, September 10, 2018
A listing for the text can be found at the SPIE Press Web site. The book was launched at a luncheon at SPIE’s Optics and Photonics conference in San Diego on August 22, 2018. 
 
The text demonstrates how to design an optical system using Synopsys CODE V, a full-featured optical design program. The complete design process (from lens definition to the description and evaluation of lens errors on to the improvement of lens performance) is developed and illustrated using the program.
 
This text is not a user’s manual for CODE V. Instead, it begins with a single lens to demonstrate the laws of optics and illustrates the basic optical errors (aberrations). Then, through a series of examples, demonstrations, and exercises, readers can follow each step in the design process to analyze and optimize the system for the lens to perform according to specifications. The text is organized to help readers (1) reproduce each step of the process including the plots for evaluating lens performance and (2) understand its significance in producing a final design.
Summary: 

Don O’Shea, Emeritus Professor of Physics, and and Dr. Julie L. Bentley of the Institute of Optics at the University of Rochester have published a text, Designing Optics Using CODE V.

Intro: 

Don O’Shea, Emeritus Professor of Physics, and and Dr. Julie L. Bentley of the Institute of Optics at the University of Rochester have published a text, Designing Optics Using CODE V.

Alumni: 

Public Lecture: Non-Euclidean Virtual Reality

The 2016 confirmation of Einstein's prediction of gravitational waves has put the spotlight back on the importance of curvature for the physics of the universe. While the ability of mass to curve our space has fueled the imagination of many, it is by far not the only instance of warped spaces being important for physics: The materials science of the very small scale -the science of nanostructures and nanoengineering- is one of them.

Soft Condensed Matter & Physics of Living Systems

Abstract:

Almost all animals must move to survive and reproduce. But it's rarely easy to move in the wild - animals typically face multiple challenges when trying to get from A to B. This talk will present loosely connected work centered on how gait, gait regulation, and gait adaptation in many-legged animals can give insight into several interesting aspects of locomotor biology.

Design of materials for gene delivery using molecular modeling

Abstract

Gene therapy holds the promise of treatment of numerous diseases including many types of cancer, cardiovascular diseases and genetic disorders. Even though methods for gene delivery have been an active research area since early 90s, no gene therapeutic agents have been FDA approved for use in humans. The progress in gene therapy has been hindered by lack of safe, predictable, and reliable methods for packaging, delivery, and transport of genetic material.

On the Stability and Optical Activity of Metallic and Bimetallic Protected Nanoclusters

Abstract

Some of the main challenges in nanoscience and nanotechnology are the reproducibility and uniformity of the properties of nanostructures. These are crucial for the advancement of this field from the fundamental point of view and future applications. The study of metallic nanoparticles passivated with thiolate ligands has rapidly grown over the last two decades. Synthesis methods have allowed obtaining nanoparticles with a precise number of atoms, which ensures the uniformity and reproducibility of their physical properties.

Public Nights at the Georgia Tech Observatory

Public Nights at the Georgia Tech Observatory are back for 2018-2019! The observatory will be open one Thursday each month for people to observe various celestial bodies. A talk will be given about thirty minutes after the Public Night begins.

Series Schedule

Sep.20, 8-10:30  Moon, Saturn, Mars

Oct.18, 7:30-10  Moon, Mars

Nov.15, 7-9  Moon, Mars

Dec.13, 7-9  Moon, Mars

Jan.17, 7-9  Moon, Orion Nebula

Feb.14, 7-9  Moon, Orion Nebula

March 14, 8-10:30  Moon, Orion Nebula

Public Nights at the Georgia Tech Observatory

Public nights at the Georgia Tech Observatory are back for 2018-2019! The observatory will be open one Thursday each month for people to observe various celestial bodies. A talk will be given about thirty minutes after the Public Night begins.

Series Schedule

Sep.20, 8-10:30  Moon, Saturn, Mars

Oct.18, 7:30-10  Moon, Mars

Nov.15, 7-9  Moon, Mars

Dec.13, 7-9  Moon, Mars

Jan.17, 7-9  Moon, Orion Nebula

Feb.14, 7-9  Moon, Orion Nebula

March 14, 8-10:30  Moon, Orion Nebula

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